Movie dads

Some of you may enjoy my latest essay at Image, about fathers in movies. Here’s an excerpt:

“I want to explain that when you’ve got four boys to cook for and look after at the tail end of a work week, finding a $5 copy of Boondock Saints feels like a win. “I really need this,” I want to tell them.”

You can read the rest here.

Comments

  1. Marc V

    Enjoyed the essay. I’m ready to ask my pastor to see if he’ll let me lead a movie-Bible study class for the summer on Wed. nights. Can the Lord be glorified through cinema? Are there Bible truths portrayed on-screen? I’d like the chance to talk with other Christians about it, round-table.

    “Evan Almighty” can be a great teaching aid. Here’s a father who was letting his worldly responsibilities interfere with his family time until it was ark building time. There’s a scene where Al Mighty explains how God answers prayer, by giving us opportunities. I use it for my 3rd graders (Sun Sch.) and it seems to sink in better when they see it on-screen rather than hearing some old guy blabbing behind a lectern.

  2. Post
    Author
    Woodlief

    Marc,
    I think the movie class is a great idea. Back in the old days of the Church, a plea went out to priests to stop making up their own sermons and instead read the sermons of the great fathers. I imagine the same admonition could apply today — there’s good stuff out there, and it may serve the flock better than the thousands of lessons teachers feel compelled to come up with out of a notion that the sermon doesn’t count unless it’s original.

  3. susan

    The movie about the rabbit was actually great though, Tony. And I’m guessing you’re NOT a fan of Cronenberg’s Crash? So I won’t recommend that one. Great post, sir. 🙂

  4. Post
    Author
    Woodlief

    Thanks, Susan. I did like Crash very much, and I’ll go you one post-modern better — I thought Memento was outstanding. I guess I instinctively recoil from anything a cabal of twenty-something intellectual fanboys get giddy about. Because I’m an old curmudgeon that way.

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